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Dan Brown

Wed

23

14:00 - 17:30

Room 1
Workshop

Crafting the Discovery Phase
Starting UX projects right

Whether you call it discovery, strategy, requirements, research, or inception, the first 20% of a design project can make or break it.

Get it right, and the team works in concert, toward well-understood goals and following clear principles.

Get it wrong, and your project collapses into a disorganised mess. In this workshop, we'll look at what makes for great discovery. Discovery is not just about conducting research and holding a kick-off meeting.

Discovery is establishing the design problem and setting a direction for the solution. It’s about collaborating with the team to build a shared understanding of the constraints and context. It’s creating a foundation from which you can confidently make decisions throughout the design process. It’s agreeing on a plan for detailing and implementing the product design.

We will talk about essential tools and techniques for discovery. We'll look at how research fits in, how to write great design principles, and how to incorporate discovery into any project situation.

You’ll get:

  • The essential ingredients for any discovery phase
  • The range of discovery activities and how to choreograph them
  • What deliverables come out of the discovery phase
  • How to incorporate discovery into new projects and projects in-flight
You’ll try:

  • Crafting your own problem statement
  • Mapping out a discovery phase
  • Planning a design workshop
  • Outlining a discovery deliverable
You are:

  • A designer of any level who need a better handle on doing discovery
  • A product manager who wants to understand how to integrate discovery into your team’s work

Thu

25

11:25 - 12:00

Auditorium I
Talk

Practical Jobs To Be Done: A Way Of Seeing

The concept of jobs to be done provides a lens for understanding value creation. It’s straightforward principle: people “hire” products to fulfill a need. 

For instance, you might hire a new suit to make you look good at a job interview. Or, you hire Facebook to stay in touch with friends. You could also hire a chocolate bar to relieve stress. 

Viewing customers in this way – as goal-driven actors in a given context – shifts focus from the psycho-demographic aspects to needs and motivations. Although the theory of JTBD is rich and has a long history, practical approaches to applying the approach are largely missing. 

In this presentation, I will highlight concrete ways to apply the jobs to be done in your work. This will not only help you design better solutions, but also enable you to contribute to broader strategic conversations.